Category Archives: Inspiration

Amritsar trip – ended with a joke by almighty

It was a weekday late evening in December 2011, my family was sat together after supper, just chit chatting and laughing. We, casually celebrated year 2011 as year of tourism, with many trips and vacations! I just asked if there is one more plan to celebrate the year and so quickly we decided to book tickets for Amritsar for January 2012. Me and my brother finished travel booking on the very same day after tentative planning!!

With some words of mouth, we got to know that Sarai is right and clean place to stay. With my uncle’s reference, we also managed to get booking at one of Sarai.

This started executing on 13th late night with train to Amritsar at early morning on 14th. It was general cold, as expected throughout the root. By the time we were reaching destination, we already saw glimpses of rainy weather. And it was indeed raining in Amritsar. We reached on 15th morning with 2 hours delay from schedule.

The very same day, just after dropping our bags at Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji Yatri Niwas – Sarai and little relaxation, we thought to have quick visit to the Golden Temple. It was Sunday and so was pretty crowded, of course moving ahead in well discipline. We decide to visit the temple and pray very next day in early morning. We only did a circular walk in the temple campus and moved for lunch. With quickly finishing lunch, we booked a taxi and by the time driver came with his car, we made a not-so-in-hurry visit to Jaliawalla Baugh.

With light rain, we moved towards Atari, border and junction to Pakistan. It is itsa kind of experience to see flag lowering ceremony live!

By evening, we returned to Amritsar. Before going for dinner, thought to check for woolen specialities and winter wear. We checked in Oswals and almost completed shopping!!! After decent shopping experience, went for dinner and finished with sweet hot Gulab Jamun! It was bit exhaustive day since we did not spend much time for rest or sleep and so we went straight back to Sarai.
We adjusted our beds and all were just relaxing. Suddenly daddy thought to have a bottle of water (in Sarai, everything is self serviced!). And he went downstairs.

We were completely unaware, but this was beginning of gloomy side of our trip…

He did not return in half an hour. We were just bit serious and thought to start his search. Very soon, a person shouting if somebody’s on floor, came around and he was shouting an ‘unknown’ person fell down. Without thinking anything we rushed to ground floor and found him laid down on a bench. The Sarai authorities had already called up ambulance and also informed the ‘uncle’s reference’ about this man! We immediately rushed to Shri Guru Ramdas Hospital by the ambulance. Doctors did EEG and gave immediate report – what I cannot believe, hear or even listen. Dad left me, us and all wondering…..! 🙁

It is very hard to write in words, what happened further.

Uncle’s reference was none but Iqubal Singh, branch manager of Vijaya Bank, Amritsar. He reached to hospital, with almost shocked, unaware of final verdict. Knowing the situation, the gentleman and lady (aunty) gave immediate support and were the host to arrange our night stay at their warm home.

What happened next is again difficult to write in one go, shall add it to the post after gaining some energy.

Many of photos taken by dad are here.

Auto fare Calculator for Indian cities

Many people either carry copy of auto fare card with them or do remember formula. However, it becomes difficult when you are roaming in multiple cities frequently.

A lot many similar apps available, however they are either platform specific, outdated or requires GPRS or other network connection. Few others are city specific.

This is a very simple attempt to overcome a couple of situations.

The application:

  • Works on almost any mobile with basic browser (internet browsing software)
  • Does not require any GPRS or other connection to run the app
  • Has support for multiple cities of India
  • Support for night fare calculation – based on device time
  • No installation required, just copy to mobile and run
  • No advertisement, no license fee – free and open source
  • Can be very easily updated
  • Has very basic and simple interface, executes and works simply

Grab it : Download http://harit.kotharee.com/app/fareCalc.htm . (Right click to the link and select ‘Save As…’ and save to your computer / or save the copy on your mobile.)

Use it : Open the saved copy of fareCalc.htm from your mobile or equivalent device, in most cases, it should open with default available browser. That’s it. No need to explain further. 🙂

Why HTMLand JavaScript?

  • Most mobile browser supports
  • No formatting / styling required
  • Widest compatibility across mobile platforms
  • No rebuild, easy to update
  • No installation required
  • Easy to share

Moon Mission

This weekend, Saturday night a sudden power failure in our area stopped many activities, but gave me a chance. Moisture in air drove everybody to go on terrace. Suddenly an idea clicked in my mind to have photography experiment on my dad’s Nikon D60 DSLR camera.

Full moon gave another opportunity. Here are few results….

Once again...

Once again...

Moon with co-star, photo taken with improper settings led to the blur photograph.

Not bad

Not bad

Good photo with co-star far away, but acceptable result and concentration.

I felt this photo best – it has a costar visible, rough surface on moon (no Hubble telescope is used! :p), sharpness is at expectedly best level.

Mission accomplished!

Summer Programmes @ VASCSC

Vikram A sarabhai Community Science Center, Ahmedabad has announced schedule for special programmes for this Summer – 2009.

Click below image to enlarge.

Program Page1Program Page 2

VASCSC is really a wonderful place to learn and have lot of experiments.

It had been my favorite place to hang and do experiments in vacation time during my school days.

I highly recommend at least a visit to this organisation.

A true youngster

He…

… was a radio operator on ships during his early life

… was a true fan of Vincent Van Gogh

… was very specific and talking for very short time over phone, without missing anything

… was a quality writer in English

… was a huge collection of vocab words

… was a very good translator

… was one of my best wishers, always asked me to take care of self

… was holding an agency for subscription of more than 20 odd, rich quality magazines published worldwide

… was using computer, Internet, and many of modern gadgets, with quiet good control over them (at old age too, living in Abrama, Valsad)

… was old by documented age, but had been young by his work, his enthusiasm and perfection

The need to write in past tense – was – arise on February 15, 2009. The youngster was none else, but Vinod Jhaverchand Meghani.

My salute to this young man.

HALF BOY and HALF MAN

A post on today’s occasion, worth to read. I received this as an forwarded e-mail from a professor.

The average age of the army man is 19 years.

He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy a beer, but old enough to die for his country.

He never really cared much for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his father’s, but he has never collected unemployment dole either.

He’s a recent college graduate; he was probably an average student from one of the Kendriya Vidyalayas, pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away.

He listens to rock and roll or hip-hop or country or gazals or swing and a 155mm howitzer.

He is 5 or 7 kilos lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or fighting the insurgents or standing gaurd on the icy Himalayas from before dawn to well after dusk or he is at Mumbai engaging the terrorists.

He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in 30 seconds and reassemble it in less time in the dark. He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively if he must.

He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.

He can march until he is told to stop, or stop until he is told to march.

He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity. His pride and self-respect, he does not lack.

He is self-sufficient.

He has two sets of combat dress: he washes one and wears the other.

He keeps his water bottle full and his feet dry.

He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own hurts.

If you’re thirsty, he’ll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food.. He’ll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.

He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands.

He can save your life – or take it, because that is his job.

He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay, and still find ironic humor in it all.

He has seen more suffering and death than he should have in his short lifetime.

He has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and is unashamed.

He feels every note of the Jana Gana Mana vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to ‘square-away’ those around him who haven’t bothered to stand, remove their hands from their pockets, or even stop talking.

In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.

Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom.
Beardless or not, he is not a boy.

He is your nation’s Fighting Man that has kept this country free and defended your right to Freedom. He has experienced deprivation and adversity, and has seen his buddies falling to bullets and maimed and blown. But,

He has asked nothing in return, except our acknowledgement of his existence and understanding of his human needs.

Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood.

And now we even have women over there in danger, doing their part in this tradition of going to War when our nation calls us to do so.

As you go to bed tonight, remember this shot. . ..
A short lull, a little shade and a picture of loved ones in their helmets.

Prayer Wheel ‘Lord, hold our Indian Army in your loving hands. Protect them as they protect us. Bless them and their families for the selfless acts they perform for us in our time of need. Amen.’
When you read this, please stop for a moment and say a prayer for our soldiers, sailors, and airmen, in all frontiers.

There is nothing attached…
This can be very powerful…
Of all the gifts you could give a Soldier, Sailor, or Airman, prayer is the very best one.

Pray for the Indian Soldier. Unlike your ‘Babus’ or ‘Netas’. He will always do you proud.

National Anthem (Collective) Instrumental Version

"woh kaagas ki kashti" – "English version

A good poem I received as an LMS (Long Message Service!), truly represents my favorite ghazal sung by Jagjit Singh.

Wanna go back to the time…

… when “getting high” meant “on a swing”,

… when “drinking” meant “apple juice”,

… when “dad” was the only “hero”,

… when “love” was “mum’s hug”,

… when “dad’s shoulder” was “gighest peak on the earth”,

… when your “worst enemies” were “your siblings”,

… when the only thing that could “hurt” you were “skinned knees”,

… when the only thing “broken” was your “toy”

and

… when “good bye” only meant “till tomorrow”!

Jewel of India says…

Here is a letter of one of the famous Indian visionary businessman:

Ratan Tata’s Letter After Financial Crisis

Publish at Scribd or explore others:

Must watch : The Story of Stuff

Or visit http://www.storyofstuff.com/

Inspiration

As I was passing the elephants, I suddenly stopped, confused by the fact that these huge creatures were being held by only a small rope tied to their front leg. No chains, no cages. It was obvious that the elephants could, at anytime, break away from their bonds but for some reason, they did not.

I saw a trainer near by and asked why these beautiful, magnificent animals just stood there and made no attempt to get away. “Well,” he said, “when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and, at that age, it’s enough to hold them. As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away.

They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.” I was amazed. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds but because they believed they couldn’t, they were stuck right where they were.

Like the elephants, how many of us go through life hanging onto a belief that we cannot do something, simply because we failed at it once before?

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